Developmental neurotoxicity testing using stem cells

02:2724 months ago

Children should grow up in a safe and healthy environment. Disruption of brain development may have enormous impact on future life and might result in disorders such as ADHD or cognitive decline. The effect of compound exposure on the developing brain is largely unknown, since in the current regulatory test procedures in experimental animals effects on the brain are rarely investigated and human relevance of these animal models is under debate.
Researchers at RIVM are developing a cell model based on human stem cells that mimics a small part of the developing brain. This method is human-relevant, animal-free, and based on mechanistic knowledge of human biology and physiology of brain development. The model can be an important component in a testing strategy to test the safety of chemicals and pharmaceuticals on the developing brain.

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Cells4Thought: using iPSCs for neurodevelopmental health

The prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), including cognitive impairments, is increasing worldwide with great impact on daily life quality. There is evidence that exposure to chemicals may contribute to the incidence of NDD. However, a causal link is lacking. Towards this goal, a human-relevant in vitro model system mimicking parts of brain development, such as neuronal network functioning, could be used for mechanistic research on how gene-environment interactions contribute to the development of NDD. This is going to be studied in the project Cells4Thought, using induced pluripotent stem cells form different individuals to study the effect of chemicals on neuronal differentiation.
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New approaches for cancer hazard assessment
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Chemical substances are subjected to assessment of genotoxic and carcinogenic effects before being marketed to protect man and the environment from health risks. For cancer hazard assessment, the long-term rodent carcinogenicity study is the current mainstay for the detection of nongenotoxic carcinogens. However, carcinogenicity studies are shown to have prominent weaknesses and are subject to ethical and scientific debate. A transition toward a mechanism-based weight of evidence approach is considered a requirement to enhance the prediction of carcinogenic potential for chemicals. At RIVM, we are working on this alternative approach for cancer hazard assessment, which makes optimal use of innovative (computational) tools and be less animal demanding. For more information, click on the link in the video or read on here (https://doi.org/10.1080/10408444.2020.1841732) and here (https://doi.org/10.1080/10408444.2018.1458818). Contact the expert (https://nl.linkedin.com/in/mirjamluijten)
03:142 months ago
Helpathon #10 – Can you help Jolanda and Elza?
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00:552 months ago